TRUMP GAMBLE MEETING mit KIM JONG-UN

März 11, 2018
Lichtgeschwindigkeit 8007

Vom Sonntag, 11. Februar 2018

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THE NEW YORK TIMES / nytimes.com berichtet am 11. März 2018:

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„Trump’s Abrupt ‘Yes’ to North Korea: The 45 Minutes That Could Alter History“

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Es ist mir immer wieder anregend, die offen und bösartig gegen TRUMP schreibende NY TIMES wahrzunehmen, wie sie so langsam anfängt TRUMP aus der Hand zu fressen. Dazu sind die Extemporationen zu solchen Themen wie hier – meeting oder negotiatian – sehr aufschlussreich, nämlich wenn irgendwo die Polemik aufhört und konkrete Argumente der Urteilskarft gebracht werden müssen. KURZ: Auch nytimes hat inzwischen gemerkt, dass TRUMPS Methode, Führer persönlich zu treffen und dabei durchaus keine Weltkriege vom Zaum zu brechen – nützlicher sein kann, als die billardartigen sonstigen Diplomatenspielchen, wo oft für die USA gar nichts herauskam.

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„WASHINGTON — Summoned to the Oval Office on the spur of the moment, the South Korean envoy found himself face to face with President Trump one afternoon last week at what he thought might be a hinge moment in history.

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Chung Eui-yong had come to the White House bearing an invitation. But he opened with flattery, which diplomats have discovered is a key to approaching the volatile American leader. “We could come this far thanks to a great degree to President Trump,” Mr. Chung said. “We highly appreciate this fact.”

 

Then he got to the point: The United States, South Korea and their allies should not repeat their “past mistakes,” but South Korea believed that North Korea’s mercurial leader, Kim Jong-un, was “frank and sincere” when he said he wanted to talk with the Americans about giving up his nuclear program. Mr. Kim, he added, had told the South Koreans that if Mr. Trump would join him in an unprecedented summit meeting, the two could produce a historic breakthrough.

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zu hohes Bein

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Mr. Trump accepted on the spot, stunning not only Mr. Chung and the other high-level South Koreans who were with him, but also the phalanx of American officials who were gathered in the Oval Office.

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His advisers had assumed the president would take more time to discuss such a decision with them first. Defense Secretary Jim Mattis and Lt. Gen. H.R. McMaster, the president’s national security adviser, both expressed caution. If you go ahead with this, they told Mr. Trump, there will be risks and downsides.

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Mr. Trump brushed them off. I get it, I get it, he said.

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Where others see flashing yellow lights and slow down, Mr. Trump speeds up. And just like that, in the course of 45 minutes in the Oval Office, Mr. Trump threw aside caution and dispensed with decades of convention to embark on a daring, high-wire diplomatic gambit aimed at resolving one of the world’s most intractable standoffs.

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The story of how this came about, assembled through interviews with officials and analysts from the United States, South Korea, Japan and China, is a case study in international relations in the Trump era. A president with no prior foreign policy experience takes on a festering conflict that has vexed the world for years with a blend of impulse and improvisation, and with no certain outcome. One moment, he is hurling playground insults and threatening nuclear war, the next he is offering the validation of a presidential meeting.

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Whether the high-stakes gamble ultimately pays off, no one can know. Given two unpredictable and highly combustible leaders, it seems just as likely that the meeting will never take place. If it does occur, the challenges are so steep, the gulf so wide and the history so fraught with misunderstanding, suspicion and broken promises that the prospect of an enduring resolution to the impasse seems remote.

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But Mr. Trump has staked his reputation as a deal maker on the presumption that he can personally achieve what no other presient has before him.

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A Thorny Road

The path to a possible meeting led through a thicket of hostility and feints. Throughout his first year in office, Mr. Trump ratcheted up economic sanctions while rattling his nuclear saber at „Little Rocket Man“ and threatening to „totally destroy North Korea“.

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Mr. Kim could match the president he called „the mentally deranged U.S. dotard“ bombast for bombast. In a New Year’s Day speech, he said he had “a nuclear button on the desk” that could launch missiles capable of reaching the United States. Mr. Trump responded with a tweet saying that “I too have a Nuclear Button, but it is a much bigger & more powerful one than his.”

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But South Korea’s president, Moon Jae-in, focused on the other part of Mr. Kim’s speech, when he declared that he would send athletes to the Winter Olympics, which would be held the next month in South Korea. A flurry of negotiations ensued at Panmunjom, the “truce village” inside the Korean demilitarized zone, that, by the standards of inter-Korean talks, went unusually well.

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For the opening ceremony, on Feb. 9, Mr. Kim sent his sister, Kim Yo-jong, while Mr. Trump sent Vice President Mike Pence. The vice president was told of a possible meeting with North Korean officials at the Games if he would tone down his message, not talk about sanctions, not meet with defectors and not bring along Fred Warmbier, whose son, Otto, an American student, died soon after being released from captivity in North Korea.

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Mr. Pence opted to do all of those anyway to show resolve, and the North Koreans canceled the meeting at the last minute. Taking the hard-line position he believed the president wanted him to take, a grim-faced Mr. Pence refused to stand for the entry of the joint Korean team that included athletes from both North and South and made a point of refusing to greet Mr. Kim’s sister, who was just 10 feet away.

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Mr. Pence’s failure to stand was taken as an insult to Mr. Moon and the South Korean public, undercutting the vice president’s intent to show solidarity with an ally. Mr. Moon had been determined to bring the Americans and North Koreans together, to the irritation of the American delegation, which believed that he was deliberately trying to stage-manage an encounter they considered awkward and inappropriate.

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Mr. Moon, by contrast, hosted Ms. Kim for a lavish luncheon at the presidential Blue House, and she surprised him with a letter from her brother. She told Mr. Moon that her brother wanted to convene a summit meeting at an early date. The two spent nearly three hours together, with Mr. Moon doing most of the talking.

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He said that he really wanted to meet Mr. Kim and improve ties, but that there was a limit to how far he could go without progress in dismantling the North’s nuclear program. He urged North Korea to talk to the Americans and said they needed to hurry so as not to lose the rare momentum from the spirit of the Olympics visits.

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A Family Envoy

After the unfortunate optics from Mr. Pence’s visit and what some viewed as a missed opportunity, Mr. Trump sent his daughter, Ivanka Trump, to the closing ceremony of the Games. She had dinner with Mr. Moon at the Blue House and briefed him on new sanctions her father would impose on North Korea, then made a public statement to reporters reaffirming the American strategy of “maximum pressure.”

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She then headed to Pyeongchang for the last two days of competition. Briefed by Mr. Pence’s staff, Ms. Trump and her team were “incredibly forceful,” as one official put it, in going over the seating plan for the box and the timing and sequencing of arrivals to avoid any surprises.

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Ms. Trump proffered a smiling, more open image that went over better in South Korea. She stood for the South Korean athletes, who this time entered the stadium separately from their compatriots from the North, and posed for photographs with famous Korean pop stars. But she too made a point of sending a message; for her guest in the box, she brought Gen. Vincent K. Brooks, commander of American forces in South Korea.

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When she attended a curling event, Ms. Trump’s team received word that the North Koreans were on their way in what the Americans thought was an effort to make a scene or prompt her to leave in an embarrassing spectacle. Ms. Trump decided to stay, and the North Koreans in the end did not come.

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All Smiles in the North

With the Olympics over, it was time for Mr. Moon to make his move. Last week, he sent two trusted aides on a two-day trip to Pyongyang: Mr. Chung, his national security adviser, and Suh Hoon, his National Intelligence Service director. Flying north, they knew that they were meeting Mr. Kim but not when.

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After landing in Pyongyang, they were taken to a riverside guesthouse where they found their rooms equipped with the internet and access to foreign television channels, including CNN. They could even surf South Korean websites, a rare privilege in the totalitarian state. As soon as they unpacked, Kim Yong-chol, a general who heads inter-Korean relations, showed up and said that they were meeting Mr. Kim that evening.

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Black limousines took the South Koreans to Azalea Hall in the ruling Workers’ Party headquarters, Mr. Kim’s workplace. They found Mr. Kim and his sister waiting to greet them with broad smiles. Mr. Chung and Mr. Suh were the first South Koreans to set foot inside the party headquarters since the Korean War.

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Mr. Chung had barely launched into his talking points when Mr. Kim said “I know” and “I understand you.” Then he laid out his proposal: talks with the United States on denuclearizing his country; a suspension of nuclear and missile tests during the talks; and his understanding that the United States and South Korea must proceed with annual joint military exercises.

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The South Koreans found Mr. Kim to be an extremely confident leader. He was closely following foreign news media, knew how he was depicted, and even joked about it. He had studied Mr. Moon’s speeches and overtures toward the North.

 

He even joked about his missile launches. “I was sorry to hear that President Moon Jae-in had to convene his National Security Council meetings early in the morning because of our missile launchings,” he told the South Koreans. “Now, he won’t lose his early morning sleep any more.”

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Mr. Kim agreed to open a direct hotline to Mr. Moon. “Now if working-level talks are deadlocked and if our officials act like arrogant blockheads, President Moon can just call me directly and the problem will be solved,” he said.

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And, he added, he was eager to hold a summit meeting with his South Korean counterpart. The South Koreans suggested Pyongyang, Seoul and Panmunjom as possible sites and asked Mr. Kim to choose. Mr. Kim said he would come to the Peace House, a South Korean building inside Panmunjom.

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The meeting and dinner, complete with wines and traditional Korean liquor, lasted from 6 p.m. to 10:12 p.m. with much laughter and bonhomie.

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After returning to Seoul on Tuesday, the South Korean officials briefed Mr. Moon and then South Korean reporters. After his news conference, Mr. Chung called General McMaster and told him that he was carrying a message from Mr. Kim to Mr. Trump. Only several people at the Blue House knew that the message included a proposal for a meeting with Mr. Trump.

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Off to Washington

Mr. Chung and Mr. Suh flew to Washington, arriving Thursday morning. By the afternoon, they were at the White House, meeting separately with General McMaster and Gina Haspel, the deputy C.I.A. director. The four then got together and were soon joined by other American officials, including Mr. Pence, Mr. Mattis, Dan Coats, the national intelligence director, Gen. Joseph F. Dunford Jr., the Joint Chiefs of Staff chairman, and John F. Kelly, the White House chief of staff.

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Joined by their ambassador to Washington, the South Korean visitors were not supposed to meet with Mr. Trump until Friday, but when he heard they were in the building, he called them to the Oval Office.

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Mr. Kim’s invitation to meet was not a complete surprise to Mr. Trump’s team. An American official said they had learned about it from intelligence agencies, so on Thursday morning, before the arrival of the South Koreans, Mr. Trump talked by phone with Secretary of State Rex W. Tillerson, who was traveling in Africa, about the possibility. What he did not tell Mr. Tillerson was that he would accept.

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Mr. Trump was eager enough, however, that once he said yes, they discussed a meeting as early as next month. The South Koreans suggested it would be better to wait until after Mr. Moon’s summit meeting with Mr. Kim in April, which led to a target of May.

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Not only did Mr. Trump surprise the South Koreans by accepting immediately, he even suggested that they make the public announcement right there and then at the White House.

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A stunned Mr. Chung retreated to General McMaster’s office to draft a statement in collaboration with the Americans. Then, using a secure telephone line, he called Mr. Moon early in the morning in Seoul to get his approval.

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Elated, Mr. Trump stuck his head into the White House briefing room to tell reporters there would be an important announcement soon, something he had never done before.

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Some of the president’s advisers objected to the idea of a foreign official making a statement from the White House lectern, so they had him do it instead on the White House driveway, where visitors typically speak with reporters. Still, it was highly unusual for a foreign official to announce an American president’s decision in a major international situation.

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Out of the Loop

Mr. Trump’s quick decision caught many off guard, including Mr. Tillerson and American allies. Television networks set up live feeds from the White House driveway to carry Mr. Chung’s announcement. Congressional leaders and top officials at the Pentagon and the State Department learned what was happening from news reports.

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The fact that it came on the same day that the president slapped stiff new tariffs on imported steel that would hit South Korea and Japan hard indicated how hasty and unplanned it was.

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While Mr. Chung headed to the driveway, Mr. Trump hurriedly called Prime Minister Shinzo Abe of Japan to let him know. Mr. Abe has worked assiduously to cultivate a close relationship with Mr. Trump and taken a hard line on North Korea, but he was left out of the loop, a fact that stung.

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I have an impression that the Japanese are not quite well informed,” said Mine Yoshiki, head of a previous Japanese delegation seeking normalized relations with North Korea. “What we have been told is awfully out of tune, I should say.”

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Mr. Trump did not reach President Xi Jinping of China until the next morning. China has backed Mr. Trump on North Korea, generating good will between Mr. Trump and Mr. Xi. But China refused last month to go along with an American plan to interdict oil tankers bound for North Korea on the high seas, demonstrating that there were limits to how far China would go in punishing Mr. Kim, given the risk of a North Korean collapse on its borders.

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Mr. Trump said his conversation with Mr. Xi went well. “President XI told me he appreciates that the U.S. is working to solve the problem diplomatically rather than going with the ominous alternative,” the president wrote on Twitter on Saturday. “China continues to be helpful!”

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But in response to Mr. Trump’s planned meeting, China is engaged in what some call “exclusion anxiety,” worried about being shut out. China would like the meeting to be held in Beijing, where six-nation talks were held with North Korea during President George W. Bush’s administration, but Chinese analysts doubt Mr. Kim would agree.

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For now, Mr. Trump is juggling these dynamics and preparing to meet the world’s most hermetic. To his advisers, Mr. Trump has said he is impressed that Mr. Kim at such a young age has outmaneuvered almost everyone, but he has added that the North Korean leader is a wild card.

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Of course, so is he. Mr. Trump vacillates between confidence and fatalism when it comes to North Korea. For the moment, he is optimistic.

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North Korea has not conducted a Missile Test since November 28, 2017 and has promised not to do so through our meetings,” he wrote on Twitter on Saturday. “I believe they will honor that commitment!”

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Dietmar Moews meint: Ich fasse kurz zusammen, was da zu Trumps Hauruck-Bewegungen in der Außenpolitik zu beobachten ist:

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TRUMP selbst, sieht sich als einen „guten Verhandler“ in der persönlichen Begegnung Face to Face mit politischen Gegnern. Er schätzt es, Leuten in die Augen zu schauen.

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Die allgemeinen Urteile dazu, dass No. 45 vergleichsweise dümmer sei als No. 44 oder No. 43 bezieht sich auf TRUMPS tägliche Aktenstudien (NIENTE) oder welthistorische Bildung (NIENTE). Doch verkennt man, dass Trump so schlau ist, gar nicht bei solchen MEETINGS zu VERHANDELN, sondern auf klare Statements zu dringen und dann wie beim Pferdehandel über PREIS und ZAHLUNGSMODUS Vorschläge zu finden.

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Trump sees himself as a master negotiator, and yet is not particularly good at it,” said Colin Kahl, a former national security official under Mr. Obama. “He isn’t thoughtful or steeped in the types of details required for this type of diplomacy. He is prone to manipulation and flattery. He often makes threats he doesn’t follow through on and promises he can’t or won’t keep. And he often throws allies under the bus. This does not add up to a recipe for success, and the stakes could not be higher.”

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But the president’s aides said he was full of surprises and should not be discounted. While noting that this would be a meeting, not a negotiation, a senior administration official, who briefed reporters on the condition of anonymity, said Mr. Trump was elected in part because he was willing to take approaches different from those of other presidents, a trait best exemplified by his North Korea policy.

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Mr. Kim is the undisputed master of his totalitarian system, the official said, and so it made sense to accept an invitation to meet with the one person who can actually make decisions instead of repeating the long slog of the past.“

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RUSSLAND SPERREN in OLYMPIA Pyeongchang 2018

Dezember 6, 2017
Lichtgeschwindigkeit 7779

Vom Mittwoch, 6. Dezember 2017

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Gerade dachte man noch, Russland liefert Nordkorea die Langstrecken-Raketentechnik –  und jetzt der Ausschluss von OLYMPIA in Südkorea – passt doch.

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DEUTSCHLANDFUNK.de berichtet am 5. Dezember 2017:

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„Olympische Winterspiele 2018 – Russland ausgeschlossen“

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Ich präsentiere hier die DEUTSCHLANDFUNK-Exposition, in der unkommentiert die INFORMATION des Tages berichtet wird. Dagegen hat die NEW YORK TIMES im nytimes.com dieses THEMA an allererster Stelle, Oben links, und in erheblichem Textumfang (dabei fällt das Wort „Thomas Bach“ erst ganz hinten, Deutschland wie immer bei der NY TIMES, eigentlich gar nicht oder marginalisiert. Indes THE GUARDIAN, meine tägliche britische Quelle hat ebenfalls umfangreich die RUSSLAND/PUTIN-Bestrafung für STAATS-DOPING klar und hart dargestellt.

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DLF.de: „…Das Internationale Olympische Komitee hat Russland wegen des Doping-Skandals von den Winterspielen 2018 in Pyeongchang ausgeschlossen. Nachweislich nicht gedopte Athleten dürften aber unter neutraler Flagge teilnehmen, gab das IOC nach einer Sitzung des Exekutivkomitees in Lausanne bekannt.

Gegen den lange Zeit für den Spitzensport zuständigen russischen Vize-Regierungschef Mutko wurde ein lebenslanges Olympia-Verbot verhängt. IOC-Präsident Bach sprach von einem beispiellosen Angriff auf die Integrität der Olympischen Bewegung und des Sports. Das Russische Olympische Komitee kündigte Einspruch gegen die Entscheidung vor dem Internationalen Sportgerichtshof an.

Russland steht im Verdacht, über Jahre hinweg systematisches, staatlich gedecktes Doping betrieben zu haben, insbesondere im Zusammenhang mit den Winterspielen in Sotschi 2014. Die Regierung in Moskau bestreitet die Vorwürfe.“

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nytimes.com 6. November 2017 by Rebecca R. Ruiz and Tariq Panja:

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„Olympics

Russia Banned from Winter Olympics by I.O.C.

LAUSANNE, Switzerland — Russia’s Olympic team has been barred from the 2018 Winter Games in Pyeongchang, South Korea. The country’s government officials are forbidden to attend, its flag will not be displayed at the opening ceremony and its anthem will not sound.

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Any athletes from Russia who receive special dispensation to compete will do so as individuals wearing a neutral uniform, and the official record books will forever show that Russia won zero medals.

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That was the punishment issued Tuesday to the proud sports juggernaut that has long used the Olympics as a show of global force but was exposed for systematic doping in previously unfathomable ways. The International Olympic Committee, after completing its own prolonged investigations that reiterated what had been known for more than a year, handed Russia penalties for doping so severe they were without precedent in Olympics history.

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The ruling was the final confirmation that the nation was guilty of executing an extensive state-backed doping program. The scheme was rivaled perhaps only by the notorious program conducted by East Germany throughout the 1960s, ’70s and ’80s.

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Now the sports world will wait to see how Russia responds. Some Russian officials had threatened to boycott if the I.O.C. delivered such a severe punishment.

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President Vladimir V. Putin seemed to predict a boycott of the Pyeongchang Games with a defiant dismissal of the doping scandal and a foreign policy in recent years that has centered on the premise that he has rescued Russia from the humiliation inflicted on it by the West after the collapse of the Soviet Union. His spokesman, Dmitri S. Peskov, said no boycott was under discussion before the announcement, however, and the news broke late in the evening in Moscow when an immediate official reaction was unlikely.

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In barring Russia’s team, Olympic officials left the door open for some Russian athletes. Those with histories of rigorous drug testing may petition for permission to compete in neutral uniforms. A panel appointed by the International Olympic Committee will rule on each athlete’s eligibility.

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Although it is unknown exactly how many will clear that bar, it is certain that the contingent from Russia will be depleted significantly. Entire sports — such as biathlon and cross-country skiing, in which Russia has excelled and in which its drug violations have been many — could be wiped out completely.

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Olympic officials made two seemingly significant concessions to Russia:

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– Any of its athletes competing under a neutral flag will be referred to as Olympic Athletes from Russia. That is a departure from how the I.O.C. has handled neutral athletes in the past. For example, athletes from Kuwait, which was barred from the 2016 Summer Games, were identified as Independent Olympic Athletes last year in Rio de Janeiro.

– Olympics officials said they might lift the ban on Russia in time for the closing ceremony, suggesting the nation’s flag could make a symbolic appearance in the final hours of the Pyeongchang Games.

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Thomas Bach, president of I.O.C., has said he was perturbed not only by Russia’s widespread cheating but by how it had been accomplished: by corrupting the Olympic laboratory that handled drug testing at the Games, and on orders from Russia’s own Olympic officials.

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This decision should draw a line under this damaging episode,” Mr. Bach said at a news conference, noting that Alexander Zhukov, the president of Russia’s Olympic Committee whom the I.O.C. suspended from its membership Tuesday, had issued an apology — something global regulators have long requested from the nation.

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In an elaborate overnight operation at the 2014 Sochi Games, a team assembled by Russia’s sports ministry tampered with more than 100 urine samples to conceal evidence of top athletes’ steroid use throughout the course of competition. More than two dozen Russian athletes have been disqualified from the Sochi standings as a result, and Olympic officials are still sorting through the tainted results and rescinding medals.

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At the coming Games, Mr. Bach said Tuesday, a special medal ceremony will reassign medals to retroactive winners from Sochi. But, in light of legal appeals from many of the Russian athletes who have been disqualified by the I.O.C., it is uncertain if all results from Sochi will be finalized in time.

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The Russian Olympic Committee was also fined $15 million on Tuesday, money that global officials said will be put toward drug-testing international athletes.

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[Read The Times’s report that first laid out the details of Russia’s doping scheme, and the exclusive story of a whistle-blower’s personal diaries that were shared with investigators.]

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The punishment announced Tuesday resembles what antidoping regulators had lobbied for leading up to the 2016 Summer Games, where Russia was allowed to participate but in restricted numbers. It is likely to face a legal appeal from Russia’s Olympic Committee.

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The decision was announced after top International Olympic Committee officials had met privately with Mr. Zhukov; Vitaly Smirnov, Russia’s former sports minister who was last year appointed Mr. Putin to lead a national antidoping commission to redeem Russia’s standing in global sports; and Evgenia Medvedeva, a two-time world skating champion.

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Everyone is talking about how to punish Russia, but no one is talking about how to help Russia,” Mr. Smirnov said, sipping a hot beverage in the lobby of the Lausanne Palace Hotel before delivering his final appeal to officials. “Of course we want our athletes there, and we want the Russian flag and anthem,” he said.

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That appeal was rejected in light of the conclusions of Samuel Schmid, a former president of Switzerland whom the Olympic committee appointed last year to review the findings of a scathing investigation commissioned by the World Anti-Doping Agency.

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The analysis is clear and water-tight,” Mr. Schmid said Tuesday. In a 30-page report, he affirmed the credibility of whistle-blowers and investigators who had followed their leads and evidence.

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Tuesday’s penalty was in line with what had been advocated by two key whistle-blowers whose accounts upended Russia’s standing in global sports over the last several years and were cited in Mr. Schmid’s report: Grigory Rodchenkov, the chemist who spent 10 years as Russia’s antidoping lab chief and was key to carrying out the cheating schemes in Sochi; and Vitaly Stepanov, a former employee of Russia’s antidoping agency who married a runner for Russia’s national team and was the first to speak publicly about the nation’s institutionalized cheating.

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The world knows that hundreds of Olympic dreams have been stolen by the doping system in the country where I was born,” Mr. Stepanov wrote in an affidavit submitted to the International Olympic Committee this fall. He had suggested banning Russia’s Olympic Committee for two years, or until the nation’s antidoping operations are recertified by regulators. Russia and its individual athletes are all but certain to miss the 2018 Paralympics given regulators’ refusal to recertify the nation last month.

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The evidence is clear, that the doping system in Russia has not yet been truly reformed,” Mr. Stepanov wrote.

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Dr. Rodchenkov is living in an undisclosed location in the United States under protection of federal authorities. In August, “Icarus,” a film detailing Dr. Rodchenkov’s move to the United States and tell-all account, was released. In addition to sworn testimony and forensic evidence, Mr. Schmid cited the film as further evidence in his report.

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Russia’s consistent denials lack any credibility, and its failure to produce all evidence in its possession only further confirms its high-level complicity,” Jim Walden, a lawyer for Dr. Rodchenkov, said Tuesday. The Russian sports ministry did not immediately respond to a request for comment.

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Tuesday’s decision could have consequences for another major sports event scheduled to be held in Russia, next year’s $11 billion soccer World Cup. The nation’s deputy prime minister, Vitaly Mutko, was Russia’s top sports official during the 2014 Sochi Games and was directly implicated by Dr. Rodchenkov. As part of Tuesday’s ruling, Mr. Mutko was barred for life from the Olympics.

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Im obigen NEW YORK TIMES-Bericht vom 6. Dezember 2017 wird besonders betont, dass es hier um eine Bestrafung des russischen Staats, des Staatschefs Putin sowie der russischen Geheimdienstler, und der Sportverantwortlichen und der inkriminierten, etwa 1000 Sportler, die allesamt gesperrt worden sind. In Südkorea sollen die russische Flagge und die Nationalhymne nicht vertreten sein.

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Es wird außerdem angesagt, dass alle Doping-Betrüger von Sotchi ihre Medaillen aberkannt bekommen haben und dass bei den kommenden Olympischen Winterspielen, Februar 2018 in Pyeongchang, Südkorea )nicht Pjöngjang in Nordkorea) die dadurch festgesetllten aufrückenden, währen Sieger von Sotchi die wohlverdiente Ehrung und Medaillen verliehen bekommen sollen.

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Ferner sollen 2018 unbelastete Olympiasportler aus Russland, die ordnungsgemäß in Pyeongchang antreten wollen, dort im Februar auch zu den Wettkämpfen zugelassen sein. Allerdings wird der russische Staat und das russische Olympische Kommitee in Pyeongchang, in SÜDKOREA, aber nicht mit der russischen Nationalflagge bei den russischen Wettkämpfern figurieren dürfen.

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THE GUARDIAN, theguardian.com am 6. Dezember 2017:

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Und damit das für die Briten gleich mal klar ist: OLYMPIA ist nicht die FIFA-WM, die ebenfalls durch Manipulationen im Jahr 2018 in RUSSLAND stattfinden wird. Der für das IOC gesperrte russische Sportminister bleibt zuständig für die Fußballer-WM 2018. Theguardian.com schreibt:

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„Mr. Mutko is also the chairman of the local organizing committee for the World Cup, but FIFA said in a statement Tuesday that the I.O.C.’s punishments for Olympic doping would have “no impact” on its preparations for the tournament, which begins in June.

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Russia banned from Winter Olympics over state-sponsored doping

Vitaly Mutko, former sports minister and 2018 World Cup chief, banned for life
• Some athletes will be able to compete at Pyeongchang 2018 under neutral flag

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Russia’s Olympic Committee has been banned from the Winter Olympics in Pyeongchang and ordered to pay $15m in costs after making what the International Olympic Committee called an “unprecedented attack on the integrity of the Olympic Games and sport”.

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Tellingly the IOC also accepted, for the first time, that the Russian state had been involved in widespread institutional doping by banning the then minister of sport, Vitaly Mutko, and his then deputy minister, Yuri Nagornykh, from any participation in all future Olympic Games.

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It is the first time the IOC has imposed a ban on a country competing under its own flag for doping. However Russia’s athletes were, however, thrown a lifeline by the IOC president, Thomas Bach, who confirmed they would be able to compete in South Korea in February provided they were not involved in a massive state-sponsored doping programme that corrupted the Sochi Winter Olympics in 2014. Such athletes will have to compete under the Olympic flag and in a uniform bearing the name “Olympic athlete from Russia”. If any Russian athlete wins a gold, the Olympic anthem will be played at the medal ceremony.

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Mutko, who is now deputy prime minister for sport, tourism and youth policy and the head of the organising committee for the 2018 World Cup in Russia, rejected suggestions there had been systematic doping only last week. Fifa also released a statement on Tuesday insisting Mutko’s ban does not affect planning for next summer’s finals.

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The IOC’s decision was announced after its 14-person executive committee spent Tuesday afternoon poring over the final report of the Schmid commission, which has been examining whether there was an “institutional conspiracy” by Russian officials within the ministry of sport to corrupt the London 2012 Olympics and the 2014 Sochi Winter Games.

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Schmid’s dramatic conclusion was there had been a “systemic manipulation of the anti-doping system in Russia” and it had come under the authority of the Russian sports ministry.

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As Bach put it in a press conference: “The report clearly lays out an unprecedented attack on the integrity of the Olympic Games and sport. As an athlete myself, I am feeling very sorry for all the clean athletes who have suffered from this manipulation.”

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There have been suggestions a ban might lead to a Russian boycott of the Winter Olympics. However no such announcement has been made by Vladimir Putin or the Russian Olympic Committee. Nonetheless, many will feel the IOC has not punished Russia enough – and that the IOC has again ducked its responsibilities, just as it did 17 months ago when it decided to allow most of the country’s athletes into the Rio Olympics.

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That decision came despite a report in July 2016 from the Canadian law professor Richard McLaren which found Russia’s government, security services and sporting authorities colluded to hide widespread doping across “a vast majority” of winter and summer sports. Some had feared a repeat performance from the IOC, despite a second report by McLaren in December 2016 which confirmed that more than 1,000 Russian athletes had been involved in, or benefited from, state-sponsored doping.

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However in the past month there has been a change in tone and language by the IOC and the World Anti-Doping Agency. It started when Wada revealed it had received fresh evidence from a whistleblower that had “reinforced” McLaren’s findings. Separately, the Oswald commission, set up by the IOC to examine Russian doping in Sochi in 2014, began to ban Russian competitors from those Games retrospectively. So far the figure stands at 25 athletes, while 11 have had medals taken away.

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The credibility of the Russian whistleblower Grigory Rodchenkov, who ran the Moscow anti-doping laboratory before fleeing last year and revealing what he knew to McLaren, was recently enhanced by the Oswald commission, who confirmed he was a “truthful witness”.

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Rodchenkov responded to the news by saying he agreed with the IOC’s decision to allow some Russians into the Pyeongchang Games which begin on 9 February as neutral athletes. However, he said the problem was even bigger than indicated.

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Rodchenkov’s lawyer, Jim Walden, said a new database, obtained by Wada last month, showed that “thousands and thousands and thousands” of Russian athletes were implicated in a “secret folder” which outlined all the times samples with performance-enhancing drugs in them had been switched for clean ones.

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Added Walden: “It is a roadmap not just to 30 athletes or the 1,000 athletes that McLaren believes, but thousands and thousands were protected by the Russian system.”

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In Fifa’s statement, which comes four days after the World Cup draw took place in Moscow, the governing body said it had taken note of the IOC’s decision and “it has no impact on the preparations for the 2018 World Cup”. It added: “Fifa takes its responsibility very seriously and is investigating the allegations made in the McLaren report. In this process, Fifa is working in close collaboration with Wada and has been in contact with Prof McLaren.

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Should there be enough evidence to demonstrate the violation of any anti-doping rules by any athlete, Fifa would impose the appropriate sanction.”

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Dietmar Moews meint: Der internationale Sport ist inzwischen ein enormes Geldgeschäft der KULTURINDUSTRIE, insbesondere Publikumsbeteiligung über Fernsehrechte rund um den GLOBUS – so auch in SÜDKOREA, in der Region Pyeongchang.

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Die Korruption ist fest verankert. Die Spitzenfunktionäre spielen das Spiel oder scheitern. Der Deutsche, Dr. jur. Thomas Bach, OLYMPIASIEGER im Fechten, hat dieses hohe IOC-Präsidentamt angestrebt – und damit war er drin, die Seite der BEGEHRLICHEN befriedigen zu müssen.

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Während der FIFA-Präsident SEPP BLATTER ausgeschieden worden ist, kann sich THOMAS BACH weiter halten, wird sich aber noch manchen Klimmzug ausdenken müssen, um PUTIN zufrieden zu stellen. Und Bach wird bei der weiteren laufenden SPORT-GESCHÄFT-Verschwörung – ob die Vergabe-Wahl der AUSTRAGUNGS-STAATEN oder die verlangte FAIRNESS, klare DOPING-Vorschriften auch einzuhalten – große Zerreißproben erleben.

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Tatsächlich handeln OLYMPIA wie auch FIFA-WM von PROFITSTREBEN und Manipulationsgeist. So hat man sich also eindeutig auf DOPING geeinigt. Es geht bei Russland und Sotchi ja auch nicht um „kein DOPING“, sondern, um „verbotenes DOPING“, im Unterschied zu „erlaubtem, geregelten DOPING“.

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Man könnte doch FRANZ BECKENBAUER, THOMAS BACH und WINTERKORN, und BIEDENKOPF/BIMBES der HYGIENE halber mal in einen Sack tun – bis die Ratten und Mäuse kommen.

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Trump bezeugt den lügenden Staatschef Abe in Japan

November 3, 2017

Lichtgeschwindigkeit 7703

am Samstag, 4. November 2017

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Die internationalen Agenturen berichten am 3. November 2017:

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„Trump zu zwölftägiger Asienreise aufgebrochen

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Washington – US-Präsident Donald Trump ist zu einer zwölftägigen Asien-Reise aufgebrochen. An Bord der Präsidentenmaschine Airforce One flog er gemeinsam mit seiner Frau Melania zunächst nach Hawaii, ehe es dann nach Tokio weitergeht, wo Trump am Sonntag eintrifft. In Japan will Trump mit Ministerpräsident Shinzo Abe und Kaiser Akihito zusammentreffen. Weitere Stationen sind China und Südkorea, wo Trump unter anderem die Krise auf der koreanischen Halbinsel besprechen will. In Vietnam und auf den Philippinen wird er an wichtigen Gipfeltreffen der Asien-Pazifik-Region teilnehmen. Dabei soll es unter anderem um den Handel in der Region gehen. Von russischer Seite war zuletzt ein Treffen mit Russlands Präsidenten Wladimir Putin ins Gespräch gebracht worden.

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nytimes.com am 3. November 2017 von Mark Landler

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Politics

Trump’s Grueling Asia Trip: 5 Nations, 12 Days

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WASHINGTON — President Trump has decided to attend a summit meeting of Pacific Rim leaders in the Philippines on Nov. 14, the White House said on Friday, a decision that will tack an extra day onto his already marathon tour of the region.

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Speaking to reporters as he left the White House for Hawaii, the first leg of his trip, Mr. Trump said he planned to spend an extra day in the Philippines at the end of his 11 days on the road.

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Later, the White House press secretary, Sarah Huckabee Sanders, confirmed that he would attend the East Asia summit, a meeting of leaders from Australia, Japan, China, Russia and other countries that his predecessor, President Barack Obama, had made a priority.

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Mr. Trump’s earlier decision to skip the meeting had rattled officials in the region, who warned that it would raise questions about the United States’ commitment to Southeast Asia.

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Coupled with Mr. Trump’s withdrawal of the United States from the Trans-Pacific Partnership and his heavy focus on the North Korea crisis, some analysts said that if he were a no-show at the summit, it would deepen questions about America’s future in the region.

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Separately, a spokesman for the Kremlin said that American and Russian officials were discussing a meeting between Mr. Trump and President Vladimir V. Putin of Russia, which could occur on the sidelines of the annual meeting of the Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation forum in Vietnam, before Mr. Trump flies to Manila.

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The importance for international affairs of any contact between the Russian and U.S. presidents can hardly be overestimated,” the spokesman, Dmitry Peskov, told reporters on Friday. On Thursday, Mr. Trump’s national security adviser, Lt. Gen. H.R. McMaster, did not rule out a meeting.

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While Mr. Trump’s decision to stay longer in Manila will be widely welcomed in Southeast Asia, it could add to the concerns of White House officials about the grueling nature of the trip — the longest tour of Asia by an American president since the President George Bush in late 1991.

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Dietmar Moews meint: US-Präsident Donald Trump nimmt nicht an der WELT-KLIMA-Konferenz, kommende Woche in Bonn, teil, sondern er bereitet – stattdessen, in dieser kommenden Woche –  seine KRIEGSTAUGLICHKEIT gegen Nordkorea vor.

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Ein US-Präsident ist hauptsächlich Außenpolitiker für die USA und Weltpolitiker, während die einzelnen USA-Staaten ihre eigenen politischen Belange mit weitreichender rechtlicher Kompetenz selbstständig gestalten. Trumps vollmundiges „American first“ muss er also in der weiten Welt beweisen, wenn er davon in Washington berichten möchte.

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Nun hat aber TRUMP inzwischen kaum noch Orte und Partner in der Welt, bei denen er einen Staatsbesuch machen könnte, ohne dass auf den öffentlichen Straßen eisige Ablehnung gegen ihn gezeigt würde.

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Jetzt macht also TRUMP eine Asienreise, bei der er einerseits bei weitgefassten Meetings nur Teilnehmer ist, nicht Hauptposten, wie beim kommenden jährlichen „annual meeting of the Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation forum in Vietnam.

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Dann haben ihm die Russen angeboten, am Rande dieser Reisetermine mit dem russischen Staatschef Vladimir Putin ein unöffentliches Gesprächstreffen zu haben.

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Außerdem hat TRUMP erheblich daran gedreht, dass eine militärische Stärkung gegenüber Nordkorea, außerhalb Südkoreas, aufgebaut werden kann. In diesem Zusammenhang soll der kürzliche Wahlsieg des japanischen Regierungschefs ABE zu einer Verfassungsänderung Japans bewegt werden, sodass Militär- und Atomwaffenächtung Japans, die noch vom Zweiten Weltkrieg her gesetzt waren, abgelöst werden, Japan (Abe) will eine Aufrüstung mit den USA in die Wege leiten, sodass für die USA Nordkorea besser anzugreifen wäre, während es für Japan hauptsächlich darum geht, den traditionellen Kriegsfeind Festland China mit einer stärkeenn japanischen Rüstung abschrecken zu können.

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Ohne zögern fährt TRUMP nach JAPAN und bezeugt den lügenden ABE, mit den FUKUSHIMA-LÜGEN- als verlässlichen Partner der USA und als außenpolitischen Erfolg seiner Asienreise, zur Freude der US-Amerikaner.

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Weltpolitisch mit Militär- und Rüstungsgeschäften aufzutrumpfen lohnt sich für US-Präsidenten fast immer.

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KOLLEKTIV INTELLIGENZ.

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MEDIATHEK von ZDF

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Doku | ZDFinfo Doku – Die Fukushima-Lüge

Als die japanische Regierung im März 2011 den atomaren Notstand ausrief, hielt die Welt den Atem an. Japan am Boden – der befürchtete Super-GAU – mit unabsehbaren Folgen für die Welt.

Beitragslänge:
43 min
Datum: BIS 4.5. 2018
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DIETMAR MOEWS
Sportflagge
Japan /Sumo

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200 TONNEN täglich hochkontaminiertes CÄSIUM-GIFT-Wasser TÄGLICH in den Ozean, jede Sekunde, ohne Unterbrechung immer weiter – und drei von vier havarierten FUKUSHIMA-REAKTOR sind außer KONTROLLE.

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„DIE FUKUSHIMA-LÜGE“

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Jeder Mensch auf der Welt kann die INTERNETZ-BEREITSTELLUNG von dem deutschen Staatsverlag ZDF info anwählen und über das Internetz anschauen.

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